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NHL suspends Alexander Ovechkin for 2 games.

In the daily events of things that happen, sometimes things happen that are totally, and impossible to comprehend.

Late yesterday, the Washington Capitals captain Alexander Ovechkin was  suspended  for 2 games and fined for almost $250,000 in salary for his PUSH to the body of Brian Campbell. While the hit was hard, it wasn’t intentional, and had it occurred in center ice, it would have been nothing beyond a 2 minute minor, if that. The news broadcasts I watched seemed to almost imply it was justified and I take a very different stance.

Dirty play should be dealt harshly, without question, and most of us would rather not see head shots and other dirty plays allowed to continue and be made totally illegal with severe on-ice and off penalties to stop this problem. But here’s the problem- others with worse actions are allowed to play on with impunity.

Read on to see if the No Hit League favors some players over others.

Matt Cooke and Mike Richards both had targeted head shots on other players and got nothing for their actions.  This inequity is where the problem lies.  Goons hitting and even AIMING at the head of their opponents, causing a grade 2 concussion and having players laying unconscious on the ice, without penalties is the problem.

A few nights ago, Semin was clipped with a high stick, and the blood rule states if a player draws blood with a stick, it’s an automatic
major, yet against the Caps and Semin, it wasn’t.  Why is this?

When a similar hit in Chicago against Semin was ignored because Semin wasn’t severely injured, the scales of justice are skewed into basing the severity of a penalty or suspension on the injury incurred.  Yet, as I wrote above, that isn’t even true.  Cooke and Richards didn’t get even a single game suspension, yet both of their targets were both severely injured.

So, this makes it look like it’s a selective enforcement rule and the NHL and specifically Colin Campbell has decided who they like and who they  dislike  and they base their justice on their personal opinions and justice based on bias is not fair or even justice at all.

Maybe if Cooke/Richards both got suspensions, then I could understand Ovie’s suspension.  That didn’t happen.

The NHL allows brutality on one hand  then  dishes out unfair suspensions because of WHO, not because of WHAT the player did.

Had Sidney Crosby committed the act Ovie did- would it have garnered the same penalty? My bet is no, and Crosby would have gotten nothing, perhaps not even the in-game penalty or game misconduct Ovie got.

Until  the NHL starts policing the sport evenly and fairly it will always be considered a joke.  Unfortunately for most of us who love
hockey, it’s a sad day when yet again, number 8 is the example of all that’s  bad  in  hockey while the full-time goons are allowed to keep
right  on  taking  blind-side  pot  shots  at  other  players  heads. Apparently, Colin Campbell doesn’t have a problem with head shots andconcussions  unless  players  he  dislikes  actually  are the ones to blame.  Otherwise, it’s a non-issue and the players are welcomed back to play immediately.  Does that almost imply those head shots are ok?

It leaves me to wonder how many games Ovie would have gotten if he did what Cooke or Richards did.

Alex Ovechkin’s hit on Brian Campbell (out for season-broken collarbone/ribs) – 2 game suspension and fined $232,645:

http://youtube.com/watch?v=

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Mike Richard’s hit on David Booth (Missed 45 games with a grade 2 concussion, was carted off the ice)- no suspension or fine:

http://youtube.com/watch?v=

eSILVbnofZM[/youtube]

Matt Cooke’s hit on Marc Savard (Likely out for season with concussion, reported to miss rest of season. Coach Claude Julien was reported saying “He’s really not doing very well.” when asked about his Center on March 15th.) – no suspension or fine:

http://youtube.com/watch?v=

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Craig Adams hit on Alex Ovechkin – no suspension or fine:

http://youtube.com/watch?v=

gkQKBGAQExQ[/youtube]

 

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